I totally contributed!

Cant wait! …….. Had to fan art.

-J

bryankonietzko:

angelasongmueller:

View from my cube.

Bryan starting to put up some of the fan art he received yesterday at the book signing.

Back on the ATLA production, we were upstairs in the studio and over the years we covered a big wall at the top of the stairs with all sorts of fanart (you can see the before and after of this wall in the “Avatar Spirits” documentary). On the Korra production, we have been moved around the building and decentralized multiple times (I’m on my fourth office in 3.5 years), and for half of that time there was a studio-wide mandate to make things “clean and corporate.” That mandate has since passed and we’ve been encouraged to “personalize and decorate” our areas, and I think/hope I’m in the final office I’ll have on this production. After the overwhelming number of fanart gifts from you generous and talented fans at the signing last night, I decided to start another fanart wall outside of my office. Angela Mueller (character design) caught me in the act of hanging up the first pieces. Once again, THANKS!

paulscheer:

BACK TO THE FUTURE

30 YEARS - REAL vs MAKE-UP 

(via michaeldantedimartino)

bryankonietzko:

Michael DiMartino (co-creator), Joaquim Dos Santos (co-executive producer), Ki-Hyun Ryu (supervising producer), and I are going to be at the Barnes & Noble in the Grove L.A. on Thursday, August 15 at 7:00 PM (one week from tomorrow) to do a (short) talk and a (longer) signing of our Dark Horse "The Legend of Korra: Art of the Animated Series" book. This is a great opportunity for anyone in the L.A. area who couldn’t make it down to San Diego Comic-Con. It will be nice and casual, and we’ll sign books until they kick us out! Hope to see you there! If there is enough time Ryu will do a mean drawing of you!

Hope to see you all there!!!!

(via michaeldantedimartino)

Q

despicablejavan asked:

Any chance those Amon Propaganda posters will get a reprint? I want one!!! Take my money!

A

I don’t think so sorry.

Just found my old DS…….. Got a chuckle out of this little MMA animation I did some years back on a flight to Korea. Used a homebrew program called Animanitee. Really fun little program.

Sorry it’s so rough…… It was done on a DS…… Just saying.

bryankonietzko:

KORRA CREW PROFILE: SYLVIA FILCAK-BLACKWOLF
Sylvia Filcak-Blackwolf has been the lone color stylist on Korra since Book 1, so she has colored all of the character and prop models for the entire series (aside from what I’ve done or tweaked as the art director)––a massive undertaking. She has a wealth of varied experience in both TV and feature animation in a variety of job positions, and is an absolute joy to work with, so I wanted to interview her for this blog to share her insights with anyone aspiring to work in this industry. I also wanted to highlight the position of color stylist: you often hear of the drawing positions and the background painters, but the artists who choose and adjust the colors for the characters and props are also incredibly important to the look and feel of an animated project. Above you can see some of Sylvia’s work from the upcoming special Avatar Wan origin episodes.
BK: You are originally from Los Angeles, right? How early on did you know you wanted to work in animation? Did having the industry around you while growing up influence that desire?
SFB: Yes, but I grew up mainly in Studio City/North Hollywood area. Growing up here I was around industry people all the time but I really did not think about it. Parents and friends were musicians/actors/producers/editors/animators. I guess I thought that this was the norm and it was like this everywhere… I really was fortunate in the fact that I fell into animation. I always loved it but never really thought about it. I wanted to be an anthropologist! Ha Ha 
BK: Did you have any formal art education after high school?    
SFB: No, but not too long after high school I started working in the animation industry.    
BK: How did you get your foot in the door in the animation industry? What was your first job?
SFB: My friend’s mother worked in animation as an ink & paint supervisor and did quite a bit at home on various productions. She asked if I could help and that was the beginning! I think my first job was doing mark-up for The Chipmunks.
BK: You’ve worked at a variety of studios. What are some of your favorite productions throughout your career?
SFB: Hmmm, Well I would have to say that Iron Giant was a lot of fun. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great Movie! In the afternoon they would cart around chocolate-covered strawberries and champagne/beer/wine. Crazy times. Spongebob Movie was fun. In general I think the crew is really important and if what you are working on happens to be fantastic then all the better. Legend of Korra is another great project that I am fortunate enough to work on. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great story! 
BK: Can you describe your job as a color stylist for people who don’t know what that entails? Have you had any other positions in animation?
SFB: A color stylist generally keys all characters, props, and FX. You read the script, look at the animatics and image boards. Paint up all the models, and get them approved. Then the fun begins: you take each model that belongs in that specific scene/sequence and style them according to their surroundings. It could be day/night, fire FX, explosions, etc… which in turn then goes back to the art director/director to approve, give notes, or change. Generally most of my jobs have been color compositing which is the same as a color stylist but you get to composite the scene as well. I have also been a inker/painter and a color composite supervisor.
BK: What are your hobbies and interests outside of animation? 
SFB: I build furniture, and do architectural woodcarving and sculpting. I love growing too. My husband and I took a break before the last SpongeBob Movie and went to Portland, Oregon where I had an apprenticeship under a fantastic master carver (Lee Johnson). An amazing person/experience that has taught me so much. 
BK: Any advice for people looking to get into animation, either young people still in school or adults who are trying to land that first gig?
SFB: I would say that animation has its highs and its lows. You will work on great projects and some not so great projects––it’s all part of the world. Stay focused, talk to as many people that you can. Build up your reel/portfolio. Network. For every person that you encounter that is not so helpful you will find great people that will help you. Basically, don’t be discouraged. Try out different projects––perhaps ones that you may think that you are not qualified to do or maybe it’s just not your style. You can learn so much from every project that you come across. It’s all about experience. Good Luck!

bryankonietzko:

KORRA CREW PROFILE: SYLVIA FILCAK-BLACKWOLF
Sylvia Filcak-Blackwolf has been the lone color stylist on Korra since Book 1, so she has colored all of the character and prop models for the entire series (aside from what I’ve done or tweaked as the art director)––a massive undertaking. She has a wealth of varied experience in both TV and feature animation in a variety of job positions, and is an absolute joy to work with, so I wanted to interview her for this blog to share her insights with anyone aspiring to work in this industry. I also wanted to highlight the position of color stylist: you often hear of the drawing positions and the background painters, but the artists who choose and adjust the colors for the characters and props are also incredibly important to the look and feel of an animated project. Above you can see some of Sylvia’s work from the upcoming special Avatar Wan origin episodes.
BK: You are originally from Los Angeles, right? How early on did you know you wanted to work in animation? Did having the industry around you while growing up influence that desire?
SFB: Yes, but I grew up mainly in Studio City/North Hollywood area. Growing up here I was around industry people all the time but I really did not think about it. Parents and friends were musicians/actors/producers/editors/animators. I guess I thought that this was the norm and it was like this everywhere… I really was fortunate in the fact that I fell into animation. I always loved it but never really thought about it. I wanted to be an anthropologist! Ha Ha 
BK: Did you have any formal art education after high school?    
SFB: No, but not too long after high school I started working in the animation industry.    
BK: How did you get your foot in the door in the animation industry? What was your first job?
SFB: My friend’s mother worked in animation as an ink & paint supervisor and did quite a bit at home on various productions. She asked if I could help and that was the beginning! I think my first job was doing mark-up for The Chipmunks.
BK: You’ve worked at a variety of studios. What are some of your favorite productions throughout your career?
SFB: Hmmm, Well I would have to say that Iron Giant was a lot of fun. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great Movie! In the afternoon they would cart around chocolate-covered strawberries and champagne/beer/wine. Crazy times. Spongebob Movie was fun. In general I think the crew is really important and if what you are working on happens to be fantastic then all the better. Legend of Korra is another great project that I am fortunate enough to work on. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great story! 
BK: Can you describe your job as a color stylist for people who don’t know what that entails? Have you had any other positions in animation?
SFB: A color stylist generally keys all characters, props, and FX. You read the script, look at the animatics and image boards. Paint up all the models, and get them approved. Then the fun begins: you take each model that belongs in that specific scene/sequence and style them according to their surroundings. It could be day/night, fire FX, explosions, etc… which in turn then goes back to the art director/director to approve, give notes, or change. Generally most of my jobs have been color compositing which is the same as a color stylist but you get to composite the scene as well. I have also been a inker/painter and a color composite supervisor.
BK: What are your hobbies and interests outside of animation? 
SFB: I build furniture, and do architectural woodcarving and sculpting. I love growing too. My husband and I took a break before the last SpongeBob Movie and went to Portland, Oregon where I had an apprenticeship under a fantastic master carver (Lee Johnson). An amazing person/experience that has taught me so much. 
BK: Any advice for people looking to get into animation, either young people still in school or adults who are trying to land that first gig?
SFB: I would say that animation has its highs and its lows. You will work on great projects and some not so great projects––it’s all part of the world. Stay focused, talk to as many people that you can. Build up your reel/portfolio. Network. For every person that you encounter that is not so helpful you will find great people that will help you. Basically, don’t be discouraged. Try out different projects––perhaps ones that you may think that you are not qualified to do or maybe it’s just not your style. You can learn so much from every project that you come across. It’s all about experience. Good Luck!

bryankonietzko:

KORRA CREW PROFILE: SYLVIA FILCAK-BLACKWOLF
Sylvia Filcak-Blackwolf has been the lone color stylist on Korra since Book 1, so she has colored all of the character and prop models for the entire series (aside from what I’ve done or tweaked as the art director)––a massive undertaking. She has a wealth of varied experience in both TV and feature animation in a variety of job positions, and is an absolute joy to work with, so I wanted to interview her for this blog to share her insights with anyone aspiring to work in this industry. I also wanted to highlight the position of color stylist: you often hear of the drawing positions and the background painters, but the artists who choose and adjust the colors for the characters and props are also incredibly important to the look and feel of an animated project. Above you can see some of Sylvia’s work from the upcoming special Avatar Wan origin episodes.
BK: You are originally from Los Angeles, right? How early on did you know you wanted to work in animation? Did having the industry around you while growing up influence that desire?
SFB: Yes, but I grew up mainly in Studio City/North Hollywood area. Growing up here I was around industry people all the time but I really did not think about it. Parents and friends were musicians/actors/producers/editors/animators. I guess I thought that this was the norm and it was like this everywhere… I really was fortunate in the fact that I fell into animation. I always loved it but never really thought about it. I wanted to be an anthropologist! Ha Ha 
BK: Did you have any formal art education after high school?    
SFB: No, but not too long after high school I started working in the animation industry.    
BK: How did you get your foot in the door in the animation industry? What was your first job?
SFB: My friend’s mother worked in animation as an ink & paint supervisor and did quite a bit at home on various productions. She asked if I could help and that was the beginning! I think my first job was doing mark-up for The Chipmunks.
BK: You’ve worked at a variety of studios. What are some of your favorite productions throughout your career?
SFB: Hmmm, Well I would have to say that Iron Giant was a lot of fun. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great Movie! In the afternoon they would cart around chocolate-covered strawberries and champagne/beer/wine. Crazy times. Spongebob Movie was fun. In general I think the crew is really important and if what you are working on happens to be fantastic then all the better. Legend of Korra is another great project that I am fortunate enough to work on. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great story! 
BK: Can you describe your job as a color stylist for people who don’t know what that entails? Have you had any other positions in animation?
SFB: A color stylist generally keys all characters, props, and FX. You read the script, look at the animatics and image boards. Paint up all the models, and get them approved. Then the fun begins: you take each model that belongs in that specific scene/sequence and style them according to their surroundings. It could be day/night, fire FX, explosions, etc… which in turn then goes back to the art director/director to approve, give notes, or change. Generally most of my jobs have been color compositing which is the same as a color stylist but you get to composite the scene as well. I have also been a inker/painter and a color composite supervisor.
BK: What are your hobbies and interests outside of animation? 
SFB: I build furniture, and do architectural woodcarving and sculpting. I love growing too. My husband and I took a break before the last SpongeBob Movie and went to Portland, Oregon where I had an apprenticeship under a fantastic master carver (Lee Johnson). An amazing person/experience that has taught me so much. 
BK: Any advice for people looking to get into animation, either young people still in school or adults who are trying to land that first gig?
SFB: I would say that animation has its highs and its lows. You will work on great projects and some not so great projects––it’s all part of the world. Stay focused, talk to as many people that you can. Build up your reel/portfolio. Network. For every person that you encounter that is not so helpful you will find great people that will help you. Basically, don’t be discouraged. Try out different projects––perhaps ones that you may think that you are not qualified to do or maybe it’s just not your style. You can learn so much from every project that you come across. It’s all about experience. Good Luck!

bryankonietzko:

KORRA CREW PROFILE: SYLVIA FILCAK-BLACKWOLF

Sylvia Filcak-Blackwolf has been the lone color stylist on Korra since Book 1, so she has colored all of the character and prop models for the entire series (aside from what I’ve done or tweaked as the art director)––a massive undertaking. She has a wealth of varied experience in both TV and feature animation in a variety of job positions, and is an absolute joy to work with, so I wanted to interview her for this blog to share her insights with anyone aspiring to work in this industry. I also wanted to highlight the position of color stylist: you often hear of the drawing positions and the background painters, but the artists who choose and adjust the colors for the characters and props are also incredibly important to the look and feel of an animated project. Above you can see some of Sylvia’s work from the upcoming special Avatar Wan origin episodes.

BK: You are originally from Los Angeles, right? How early on did you know you wanted to work in animation? Did having the industry around you while growing up influence that desire?

SFB: Yes, but I grew up mainly in Studio City/North Hollywood area. Growing up here I was around industry people all the time but I really did not think about it. Parents and friends were musicians/actors/producers/editors/animators. I guess I thought that this was the norm and it was like this everywhere… I really was fortunate in the fact that I fell into animation. I always loved it but never really thought about it. I wanted to be an anthropologist! Ha Ha

BK: Did you have any formal art education after high school?   

SFB: No, but not too long after high school I started working in the animation industry.   

BK: How did you get your foot in the door in the animation industry? What was your first job?

SFB: My friend’s mother worked in animation as an ink & paint supervisor and did quite a bit at home on various productions. She asked if I could help and that was the beginning! I think my first job was doing mark-up for The Chipmunks.

BK: You’ve worked at a variety of studios. What are some of your favorite productions throughout your career?

SFB: Hmmm, Well I would have to say that Iron Giant was a lot of fun. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great Movie! In the afternoon they would cart around chocolate-covered strawberries and champagne/beer/wine. Crazy times. Spongebob Movie was fun. In general I think the crew is really important and if what you are working on happens to be fantastic then all the better. Legend of Korra is another great project that I am fortunate enough to work on. Great Crew. Great Directors. Great story!

BK: Can you describe your job as a color stylist for people who don’t know what that entails? Have you had any other positions in animation?

SFB: A color stylist generally keys all characters, props, and FX. You read the script, look at the animatics and image boards. Paint up all the models, and get them approved. Then the fun begins: you take each model that belongs in that specific scene/sequence and style them according to their surroundings. It could be day/night, fire FX, explosions, etc… which in turn then goes back to the art director/director to approve, give notes, or change. Generally most of my jobs have been color compositing which is the same as a color stylist but you get to composite the scene as well. I have also been a inker/painter and a color composite supervisor.

BK: What are your hobbies and interests outside of animation?

SFB: I build furniture, and do architectural woodcarving and sculpting. I love growing too. My husband and I took a break before the last SpongeBob Movie and went to Portland, Oregon where I had an apprenticeship under a fantastic master carver (Lee Johnson). An amazing person/experience that has taught me so much.

BK: Any advice for people looking to get into animation, either young people still in school or adults who are trying to land that first gig?

SFB: I would say that animation has its highs and its lows. You will work on great projects and some not so great projects––it’s all part of the world. Stay focused, talk to as many people that you can. Build up your reel/portfolio. Network. For every person that you encounter that is not so helpful you will find great people that will help you. Basically, don’t be discouraged. Try out different projects––perhaps ones that you may think that you are not qualified to do or maybe it’s just not your style. You can learn so much from every project that you come across. It’s all about experience. Good Luck!

Saw that Mike and Bryan posted pictures of these awesome buttons given to us by an amazing fan at SDCC…… I finally unpacked and figured I’d post mine! So cool! Thanks!

My buddy had an extra streetfighter ll cabinet sitting around. He was nice enough to give it to my jiu jitsu school. I got to class a bit early and found these two guys playing (after their class of course) brought a little tear to my eye it did.

bryankonietzko:

pjbyrne:

#comicon #korra

Backstage/onstage at the Korra SDCC panel.

bryankonietzko:

pjbyrne:

#korra #comicon ! Xo

FYI, I mumbled “G’mornin.” It was early.

michaeldantedimartino:

Thanks to everyone who came out to visit us at the Nickelodeon signing on Friday.  It was a whirlwind day, so I’m glad I had a few moments to take a few pictures to remember the good times.  Thanks to Lauren Montgomery (Top photo, 3rd from the right) for drawing such a beautiful illustration for this year’s print.  Apparently, they sold out fast!
michaeldantedimartino:

Thanks to everyone who came out to visit us at the Nickelodeon signing on Friday.  It was a whirlwind day, so I’m glad I had a few moments to take a few pictures to remember the good times.  Thanks to Lauren Montgomery (Top photo, 3rd from the right) for drawing such a beautiful illustration for this year’s print.  Apparently, they sold out fast!

michaeldantedimartino:

Thanks to everyone who came out to visit us at the Nickelodeon signing on Friday.  It was a whirlwind day, so I’m glad I had a few moments to take a few pictures to remember the good times.  Thanks to Lauren Montgomery (Top photo, 3rd from the right) for drawing such a beautiful illustration for this year’s print.  Apparently, they sold out fast!

(via bryankonietzko)

Just a little Jet-stream Sam fanart cause why not……

 SDCC Was an absolute blast! Thanks to all the amazing Korra fans who made it down and braved the lines!

michaeldantedimartino:

bryankonietzko:

On behalf of Bryke, I’d like to thank ALL the LOK/ATLA fans who came out to San Diego Comic-Con, fought the crowds, waited in line, dressed up, did fanart, shared with us your passion and enthusiasm, and everything else. It was really special for us to watch the Book 2 trailer and premiere episode with such a large group of awesome fans. We both got a bit misty. This was by far the best convention for me. I hope you all had a great time as well. Get home safely. Love, Bryan

Yes, thanks everyone!  It was an amazing weekend!